Archive for May, 2011

Money Buys Access, Access is Power

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

The Branches of Government

Political reporters this weekend reported on the overwhelming influence of money in state politics.

Long story short: with Republicans in charge, there’s more money — from rich and powerful interests — in state politics than ever before.

And with the new GOP rules that raise contribution limits and allow direct donations from businesses, the influence of special interest groups — not hard-working citizens who can’t afford lobbyists — is only going to increase.

“Lobbyists had busy year in Nashville,” Times Free Press:

Special interests this year spent millions of dollars seeking to influence the Tennessee General Assembly on issues ranging from a proposed cap on personal injury lawsuit awards to letting grocery stores sell wine, records show.

Fights in these and other areas, including education policy and telecommunications competition, often played out not only in committee rooms and on the House and Senate floor but behind the scenes in lawmakers’ offices, legislative corridors and sometimes lavish receptions for lawmakers.

Groups also spent money in more public ways with studies, telemarketing campaigns and advertising aimed at encouraging the public to pressure legislators.

In the view of Sen. Andy Berke, D-Chattanooga: “Special interests play an outsized role in our government and especially in our legislature.”

Obviously, what we do affects wholesale industries, but it’s difficult not to look at what goes on in the legislature and worry about the individual citizen having his proper say, also,” Berke said.

House Majority Leader Gerald McCormick, R-Chattanooga, countered that lobbyists represent Tennesseans who don’t have time to come to the legislature every day.

It’s good for anyone to get their story in front of the legislators, especially the legislators that aren’t necessarily familiar with the issue. In that way, I think just anyone coming to see you would be helpful to their cause,” McCormick said.

Moreover, he said, “We can’t stop people from lobbying. I think the First Amendment makes it clear that people can come lobby, so we have set up a system where they have to at least report who’s paying them.

Nearly $520,000 was spent in total. That’s according to filings on the Tennessee Bureau of Ethics and Campaign Finance website. But it was only a fraction of lobbying costs. The reporting period came seven weeks before the May 21 end of the legislative session, so many totals will be higher.

Other lobby disclosures reveal scrambling by Amazon.com to fend off lawmakers and retailers who hoped to force it to collect state sales taxes at distribution centers it is building in Chattanooga and Bradley County.

Amazon increased its lobbying staff from one to 10, records show.

AT AN ADVANTAGE

Dick Williams with the watchdog group Tennessee Common Cause, said that when combined with campaign contributions, groups that lobby at the Capitol have an advantage.

Businesses, in particular, benefit, he said.

It just flies in the face that lobbying and contributions don’t influence legislation,” Williams said. Companies “want to get results that directly affect their bottom line.”

“$519,000 Used To Entertain State Lawmakers,” WSMV:

Special interest groups spent at least $519,000 this year wining and dining state lawmakers. Last year, even though the legislative session was longer, only $390,000 was spent.

You’ve got a lot of new legislators that special interests or lobbying groups want to ‘educate’ to their issues,” said Dick Williams of Common Cause of Tennessee, a voter watchdog group.

The five of the most expensive events were:

  • The Farm Bureau spent more than $23,000 on a luncheon
  • AT&T shelled out $22,000 for a reception
  • The Hospital Association spent $18,000
  • The School Board Association
  • The Chamber of Commerce reported events costing $17,000.

AT&T had a bill opposed by small phone companies up in the Legislature. The hospital association was a big backer of capping lawsuit damages. The School Board Association was the force behind this year’s most controversial issue: ending collective bargaining for teachers.

“Corporations and for-profit companies don’t spend that kind of money on something they don’t feel is going to bring them some return either financial or otherwise,” said Williams.

“Interest groups wined, dined TN lawmakers,” The Tennessean:

Special interest groups and lobbyists, ranging from the Tennessee Concrete Association to the Tennessee Bar Association, hosted 75 events, according to reports filed with the Tennessee Ethics Commission.

“We’re always dealing with concentrated benefits and distributed costs,” said community activist and tea party leader Ben Cunningham. “That’s the reality of government. Everybody pays for it, and in many cases the recipients of government largess are small groups, small corporations … who can justify spending huge amounts of money on attaining special favors. That’s the nature of the beast.”

Money buys access

Cunningham said the average citizen has a difficult time getting the attention of his state senator or representative the way special interest groups can with expensive events.

“Money means access, and access means power,” Cunningham said. “That is very much true in politics today. It’s probably going to continue to be true, unfortunately.”

Other expensive events were held by corporations including AT&T, which hosted a reception with an open bar and hors d’oeuvres, at a cost of $22,406.39.

RELATED ARTICLES

Chattanooga Times Free Press Rails Against Bank Influence. “It’s pretty obvious that the Republican-dominated Tennessee General Assembly puts the interests of banks ahead of those of the average Tennessean. Why else would legislators be in such a rush to approve a law that would significantly reduce the advance warning home-owners receive before their property is foreclosed? The only plausible explanation is that legislators are far more willing to do the bidding of the well-heeled bankers and their lobbyists than to properly serve and protect those who elected them to office. [“Foreclosure bill is bad law,” Chattanooga Times Free Press Editorial Board, 5/13/11]

Gov. Bill Haslam Hosts GOP Fundraiser During Legislative Session. The lavish soirée was held March 31 at the governor’s mansion in the “the party room.” Tickets ranged from $3,000 to $25,000. [Humphrey on the Hill, May 23, 2011]

Haslam Flaunts Fundraising Ethics Rules. State law bans fundraising by legislators while the General Assembly is in session. It was passed years ago to address public perceptions that lawmakers were “shaking down” special interests with business being considered by the legislature. [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 3/22/11]

Memorial Day Statement: Honor Our Heroes By Ending Afghan War

Friday, May 27th, 2011

Chip Forrester, Chairman of the Tennessee Democratic Party, issued the following statement in commemoration of Memorial Day Weekend:

As we pay respects to those who have died in pursuit of preserving this great nation — from the Revolution to the Civil War and forward — let us honor these fallen soldiers and their heroic efforts to protect freedom by resolving to end the war in Afghanistan.

With the killing of Osama bin Laden fresh in our minds, there is no better tribute to the 1,500 soldiers slain over the last decade in Afghanistan than to hasten President Barack Obama’s troop withdrawal plan and start bringing home those legions of brave men and women.

We should never forget the sacrifices of our American servicemen and women. This Memorial Day, we should honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice by remembering and supporting fully the new generation of warriors and veterans who have served this country fighting for the same cause.

BACKGROUND

The Hill: U.S. House narrowly defeats effort to scale down Afghan war in close 204-215 vote. [The Hill, 5/26/11]

Bipartisan Tennessee delegation, consisting of Democratic Reps. Jim Cooper, Steve Cohen and Republican Rep. Jimmy Duncan, vote to end Afghan war. [U.S. House Clerk roll call, 5/26/11]

Reps. Tim Wirgau, Glen Casada: Out-of-work Tennesseans, You’re On Your Own

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Jobs aren’t the only thing you can’t find in Tennessee, we’re also in the middle of a major leadership crisis.

Democrats won the fight to include jobless benefits for 28,000 Tennesseans in the final state budget, but it wasn’t without callous and incorrect dissent from Republicans.

GOP Rhetoric:

Rep. Glen Casada: “I would contend the answer to that is it’s up to individuals to help their family and their friends and neighbors who don’t have a job.” [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 5/20/11]

Rep. Tim Wirgau: “We got people who can’t find jobs, but we got more people who don’t look for jobs because we keep handing them money.” [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 5/20/11]

Gov. Haslam’s first budget didn’t include this funding. His administration said helping jobless Tennesseans was not a “top priority.” [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 5/20/11]

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey opposed extending the benefits, saying that after 79 weeks “you have to draw the line in the sand and say: ‘This is it.’” [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 5/21/11]

***

Instead of looking for meaningful solutions to fix our state economy by laying out serious plans to put 300,000 out of work Tennesseans back on the job, our elected leaders Rep. Glen Casada and Rep. Tim Wirgau demonized citizens for being out of a job.

THE FACTS: Bad GOP Economy, Lack of Jobs to Go Around

Tennesseans are looking for jobs, but, under this Republican leadership, the state economy is toxic. When the jobs picture in 47 states has stabilized or improving – how is it that Tennessee’s unemployment problem is getting worse? [Bloomberg, 5/20/11]

Payrolls grew in 42 states in April. The only states going the opposite direction were Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee.

The jobs that do open up are getting tons of attention.

  • In Hamilton County, Amazon.com  received 4,300 applications in two days. They can only hire a fraction of those people. You can’t tell me people aren’t looking. [Memphis Business Journal, 5/18/11]
  • In Tullahoma, 60 people applied for 10 jobs — at McDonalds. [Tullahoma News & Guardian, 4/28/11]
  • In Shelby County, more than 20,000 job-seekers applied over 14 days to work at a brewery that plans to hire 500 workers over the next five years. [The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, 4/13/11]
  • In Montgomery County, “thousands of people” attend a two-day job fair in Clarksville. [The Leaf-Chronicle, 4/28/11]
  • In Rutherford County, 800 people apply for teaching positions. [Daily News Journal, 5/15/11]
  • In Knox County, Jobs News’ drew more than 1,400 seekers. [WVLT, 5/4/11]

Betsy Phillips at The Nashville Scene has more on Wirgau and Casada:

I hope y’all didn’t miss this little gem on Friday. In a story about extending the unemployment benefits for thousands of our most-screwed Tennesseans, Glen “Let Then Eat Cake” Casada and Tim Wirgau argued against the measure.

Andy Sher, in the Chattanooga Times Free Press , has the relevant quotes.

First from Casada:

But Rep. Glen Casada, R-College Grove, the former House Republican Caucus chairman, spoke against acting, saying that although most of the money comes from the federal government, it affects all taxpayers.

“We cannot continue to borrow money to give to people who don’t have a job after 79 weeks,” Casada told the chamber. “I would contend the answer to that is it’s up to individuals to help their family and their friends and neighbors who don’t have a job.”

Apparently Casada doesn’t know that individuals who have family, friends and neighbors are taxpayers, but Casada is … well, Casada. Hard to even get mad at him anymore, really.

But Tim Wirgau is a more interesting case. He says, “We got people who can’t find jobs, but we got more people who don’t look for jobs because we keep handing them money.” Got that? There are, according to Wirgau, people who can’t find jobs — that’s one group — but there’s a larger group of people who don’t even bother to look for jobs because they’re lolling around counting that sweet unemployment money.

In Wirgau’s own district in March, there were 3,420 people out of work. If some of them can’t find jobs but “more” of them aren’t even bothering to look, that means there are, at the least, 1,711 people in District 75 who just aren’t trying hard enough, by Wirgau’s own metric. There are jobs; those jackasses just aren’t working them.

Here’s my question: If what Wirgau says is true — there are all those people who could find jobs, if they’d just look, which would mean there’s at least 1,711 open positions in his district, why isn’t he setting up some kind of program to tell the people who can’t find jobs about them?

 

 

 

It Pays to Be Friends with Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a bad habit of croonyism and cooking up special government deals for his friends. Sadly, for the Lt. Governor, it’s business as usual.

News Channel 4 has the most recent story:

Legislative Staffers Get Raises During Freeze

Those Given Pay Hikes Worked For Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey

The I-Team found Lt. Gov. and Speaker of the Senate Ron Ramsey approved pay hikes for 18 senate staffers last fiscal year at the same time both former Gov. Phil Bredesen and the Legislature didn’t allow raises for the other 42,825 employees of the state.

They even sent state workers a letter letting them know raises were not possible because of state budget constraints.

So how did these staffers get raises?

Records obtained by the I-Team show the staffers got what’s called a “classification upgrade.” That’s when a raise is given to keep a salary competitive.

These staffers didn’t get a promotion. They didn’t receive more schooling to earn a higher salary. They just got it because Ramsey felt they deserved it.

“There’s nothing wrong with that — nothing,” said Ramsey.

“Do you think the rest of state workers, when they learn of these classification upgrades, will feel that way?” asked I-Team reporter Caroline Moses.

“I do,” Ramsey said.

Not long ago, Ramsey was caught with his hand in the taxpayer cookie jar on behalf of his rich friend. The Daily News Journal broke the story, but their archives have covered up the story. The Knoxville News Sentinel blogged about it though.

Ramsey seeks to reduce friend’s property taxes

Gatton.jpg

Murfreesboro’s Daily News Journal had a great real-estate scoop this week:

A developer with 187 acres of vacant land off Medical Center Parkway would get a $273,058 tax break if proposed legislation by Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey were the law today.

Ramsey’s bill would cap appraisal increases on vacant land at 25 percent …

Ramsey, an East Tennessee Republican, said he came up with the idea after learning his friend and constituent C.M. Gatton of Bristol faces the higher tax bill based on land in Murfreesboro he owns that was recently reappraised at about $30 million …

If (the assessor’s) value remains in place, Gatton faces an annual tax bill of about $282,758 for both commercial and residential land. That’s in addition to city taxes owed on the property.

“Nobody can afford that,” Ramsey said during a phone interview this past week.

The Daily News Journal was none too happy with Ramsey’s legislative meddling:

Editorial: Lt. Gov.’s tax break bill unfair to county
http://www.dnj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2011104140…

12:00 AM, Apr. 14, 2011

But Ramsey, who admitted he came up with the idea for the bill after learning about Gatton’s situation, wants to help his friend even more. Under his proposed legislation, the reappraisal would only raise the value of Gatton’s land to $1.6 million, resulting in an annual tax bill of $9,701.

“It’s not fair,” Boner told The Daily News Journal. “I’m not against a rich man making millions, but he still has to pay his fair share of taxes. … If they pass this law, it’s not going to be good to anybody. It’s going to cost the county billions in assessed value. It will be millions in tax dollars.

“Somebody is going to make up the difference.”

And that “somebody,” Boner refers to, is the rest of us taxpayers.

More than lost revenue, this bill is just plain wrong and an abuse of office by the lieutenant governor. It is a favor for a friend that could have far-reaching effects on our county’s strained coffers as well as those of others.

Ramsey’s legislation has not moved through the General Assembly’s committee process, and we hope it never does.

It Pays to Be Friends with Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a bad habit of croonyism and cooking up special government deals for his friends. Sadly, for the Lt. Governor, it’s business as usual.

News Channel 4 has the most recent story:

Legislative Staffers Get Raises During Freeze

Those Given Pay Hikes Worked For Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey

The I-Team found Lt. Gov. and Speaker of the Senate Ron Ramsey approved pay hikes for 18 senate staffers last fiscal year at the same time both former Gov. Phil Bredesen and the Legislature didn’t allow raises for the other 42,825 employees of the state.

They even sent state workers a letter letting them know raises were not possible because of state budget constraints.

So how did these staffers get raises?

Records obtained by the I-Team show the staffers got what’s called a “classification upgrade.” That’s when a raise is given to keep a salary competitive.

These staffers didn’t get a promotion. They didn’t receive more schooling to earn a higher salary. They just got it because Ramsey felt they deserved it.

“There’s nothing wrong with that — nothing,” said Ramsey.

“Do you think the rest of state workers, when they learn of these classification upgrades, will feel that way?” asked I-Team reporter Caroline Moses.

“I do,” Ramsey said.

Not long ago, Ramsey was caught with his hand in the taxpayer cookie jar on behalf of his rich friend. The Daily News Journal broke the story, but their archives have covered up the story. The Knoxville News Sentinel blogged about it though.

Ramsey seeks to reduce friend’s property taxes

Gatton.jpg

Murfreesboro’s Daily News Journal had a great real-estate scoop this week:

A developer with 187 acres of vacant land off Medical Center Parkway would get a $273,058 tax break if proposed legislation by Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey were the law today.

Ramsey’s bill would cap appraisal increases on vacant land at 25 percent …

Ramsey, an East Tennessee Republican, said he came up with the idea after learning his friend and constituent C.M. Gatton of Bristol faces the higher tax bill based on land in Murfreesboro he owns that was recently reappraised at about $30 million …

If (the assessor’s) value remains in place, Gatton faces an annual tax bill of about $282,758 for both commercial and residential land. That’s in addition to city taxes owed on the property.

“Nobody can afford that,” Ramsey said during a phone interview this past week.

The Daily News Journal was none too happy with Ramsey’s legislative meddling:

Editorial: Lt. Gov.’s tax break bill unfair to county
http://www.dnj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2011104140…

12:00 AM, Apr. 14, 2011

But Ramsey, who admitted he came up with the idea for the bill after learning about Gatton’s situation, wants to help his friend even more. Under his proposed legislation, the reappraisal would only raise the value of Gatton’s land to $1.6 million, resulting in an annual tax bill of $9,701.

“It’s not fair,” Boner told The Daily News Journal. “I’m not against a rich man making millions, but he still has to pay his fair share of taxes. … If they pass this law, it’s not going to be good to anybody. It’s going to cost the county billions in assessed value. It will be millions in tax dollars.

“Somebody is going to make up the difference.”

And that “somebody,” Boner refers to, is the rest of us taxpayers.

More than lost revenue, this bill is just plain wrong and an abuse of office by the lieutenant governor. It is a favor for a friend that could have far-reaching effects on our county’s strained coffers as well as those of others.

Ramsey’s legislation has not moved through the General Assembly’s committee process, and we hope it never does.

Republican-Controlled House Approves Attack on Tennessee Teachers

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Bill would strip the ability of Tennessee teachers to effectively negotiate contracts

(Nashville) – The Tennessee House of Representatives passed an anti-teacher bill Wednesday that continues an effort to strip teachers of their ability to effectively negotiate for better classrooms for students and better working conditions for their profession.

“This bill is a dishonest effort to reach an agreement with the Senate that will destroy all rights of more than 52,000 Tennessee teachers to negotiate for better classrooms, wages and learning environments for Tennessee students,” said House Democratic Caucus Chairman Mike Turner (D-Old Hickory). “This is an attack on Tennessee teachers; nothing less.”

The anti-teacher bill, which is expected to pass the full Republican-controlled legislature in another form, will decrease the rights of teachers to effectively negotiate a contract covering their salary, benefits, working conditions, school safety, class size, planning time, time to teach, length of the school day, scheduling and other priorities.

“This is a political game; the Republican majority is calling it a ‘reform,’” Turner said. “They simply don’t want public education to exist in this state at all. This is a vote to take away our teachers’ ability to better their careers, their family life and most importantly the learning environment of Tennessee students.”

The bill will now head back to the Senate and subsequently a conference committee with the House. The conference committee is expected to fully strip the rights of teachers to better their careers and the learning environment for Tennessee students.

Opponents of the bill argued that the brightest college students will simply choose professions other than teaching, or move out of Tennessee.

“We’re asking all citizens, especially our teachers, their families and their friends to call the state legislature and ask their House and Senate members to vote against the final form of this bill.”

Members of the General Assembly may be reached at (615) 741-1100.

###

Final Vote on the Bill: 59-39

Ayes: David Alexander, Harry Brooks, Kevin Brooks, Sheila Butt, Joe Carr, Glen Casada, Jim Cobb, Jim Coley, Vince Dean, Vance Dennis, Bill Dunn, Linda Elam, Jimmy Eldridge, Joshua Evans, Jeremy Faison, Richard Floyd, John Forgety, Jim Gotto, Curtis Halford, Steve Hall, David Hawk, Ryan Haynes, Joey Hensley, Matthew Hill, Andy Holt, Julia Hurley, Curtis Johnson, Phillip Johnson, Kelly Keisling, Ron Lollar, Jon Lundberg, Debra Maggart, Pat Marsh, Judd Matheny, Jimmy Matlock, Gerald McCormick, Steve McDaniel, Steve McManus, Don Miller, Richard Montgomery, Frank Nicely, Mark Pody, Dennis Powers, John Ragan, Barrett Rich, Bill Sanderson, Charles Sargent, Cameron Sexton, Tony Shipley, Mike Sparks, Art Swann, Curry Todd, Eric Watson, Terri Lynn Weaver, Mark White, Ryan Williams, Tim Wirgau, Rick Womick.

Noes: Joe Armstrong, Eddie Bass, Tommie Brown, Scotty Campbell, Karen Camper, Barbara Cooper, Charles Curtiss, John DeBerry, Lois DeBerry, JoAnne Favors, Craig Fitzhugh, Dale Ford, Brenda Gilmore, G.A. Hardaway, Bill Harmon, Mike Harrison, Sherry Jones, Mike Kernell, Mike McDonald, Larry Miller, Gary Moore, Jimmy Naifeh, Gary Odom, Antonio Parkinson, Joe Pitts, Mary Pruitt, Bob Ramsey, Jeanne Richardson, Dennis Roach, Johnny Shaw, David Shepard, Janis Sontany, Mike Stewart, Charles Tidwell, Joe Towns, Jr., Johnnie Turner, Mike Turner, Kent Williams, John Mark Windle.

 

Democratic Party Chairman Urges Governor to ‘Act Responsibly’

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 17, 2011

$60M in Federal Jobless Benefits for 28,000 Tennesseans Lost if Republicans Fail to Act

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Chip Forrester issued the following statement urging Gov. Bill Haslam and Republican legislators to pass law to reinstate jobless benefits for 28,000 Tennesseans:

Partisan politics shouldn’t threaten the economic future of 28,000 Tennesseans who can’t find work due to a recession that was no fault of their own.

Gov. Bill Haslam and Republican legislators haven’t lived up to their promise to create jobs, and now their negligence is jeopardizing critical financial support that is keeping children fed, bills paid and families out of foreclosure.

We’ve seen harmful bills that rob citizens and teachers of their rights get all the attention this session. Now Republicans have a chance to make an actual difference by fixing their screw up.

Mr. Haslam needs to prove he’s serious about governing – not scoring political points. The livelihood of nearly 30,000 citizens is on the line. Republicans owe it to these hurting families to act responsibly.

FACTS:

US Department of Labor estimates unemployment benefits give taxpayers a 2-to-1 return on investment. For the modest expenditure of less than $2 million, Tennessee would receive $60 million, which translates to $120 million of economic activity, according to a study commissioned by the labor department. The study suggests these dollars are injected quickly into the local economy and could potentially add more than $5 million directly to state sales tax collections. [US Department of Labor, 11/10]

Democrats scramble on to revive jobless benefits that Republicans failed to prioritize. Republicans, who control the General Assembly and set the legislative schedule, failed to pass a law to extend unemployment benefits for 28,000 jobless Tennesseans. Now legislative Democrats are pushing to reinstate the benefits, with House and Senate committees scheduled to meet Monday to consider last-minute bills to resurrect the program. Success would bring nearly $60 million in federal funds to pay up to 20 more weeks of benefits for Tennesseans unable to find jobs in a still-fragile economy. But it’s unclear whether Republican Gov. Bill Haslam and the Republican-controlled General Assembly will go along. [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 5/15/11]

GOP Sen. Mark Norris says Haslam administration signaled they wouldn’t pursue bill to extend jobless benefits. Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris said today that state Employment Security Administrator Don Ingram last week “made it very clear that the administration’s position at least had been that they didn’t intend to pursue it.” [Chattanooga Times Free Press, 5/16/11]

 

Teacher Appreciation

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

This week Republican lawmakers in Tennessee moved one step closer to silencing the voice of teachers — but they also took one step back.

Radical Republicans in the Senate passed a plan to do away with collective bargaining, banning teachers from advocating for instruction prep time, reasonable class sizes and more one-on-one instruction.

Sen. HerronBut the plan stalled Tuesday in a House committee. Now we have a chance to protect teachers’ rights and keep radical Republicans from setting our schools back four decades. We need to act fast.

Click here to call or email members of the House Education Committee. Tell them “collective bargaining works for Tennessee students!”

It’s a sad irony that attacks on educators come during Teacher Appreciation Week, a time when we should be honoring those who educate and inspire our youth.

Show teachers your appreciation by calling or emailing the House Education Committee and ask them to vote to protect teachers’ rights.

Many Tennesseans are shocked that their Republican representatives would work to weaken teachers’ rights and privatize education.

During impassioned speeches on Monday, Sens. Andy Berke, Roy Herron, Lowe Finney and Eric Stewart stood up for teachers and stood up for what is right.

Their words are encouraging and, after you call the House Education Committee, we want you to see what our senators said:

Sen. Andy Berke, District 10:

“We advance student achievement when we work together with teachers and stakeholders toward a common purpose, not when we attack them.”

Sen. Roy Herron, District 24:

There are things we need to do in education and all of them revolve around good quality teachers… For the life of me, I cannot see how taking away teachers’ voices on important issues encourages people to go into teaching.”

Sen. Lowe Finney, District 27:

“Ladies and gentlemen, we ought to be about the business of making teachers our partners because it’s going to affect those students who sit in that classroom.”

Sen. Eric Stewart, District 14:

“Teachers are expected to reach goals that are unattainable with resources that are often inadequate, but the miracle is most times they accomplish the impossible.”

Hello world!

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

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Democrats seek public input on delegate selection plan

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Tennessee Democrats have published a draft plan to select delegates to the 2012 Democratic National Convention. The delegate selection process is open to all voters who wish to participate as Democrats.

“This plan provides Tennessee Democrats a blueprint for getting involved and making their voice heard in the 2012 presidential election cycle,” said Chip Forrester, Chair of the state party. “We advocate for open, accountable government and we hold ourselves to the same standard so we’re looking for citizen feedback on the plan before the rules are adopted by the state party executive committee.”

The delegate selection plan specifies the methods and timetable for selecting delegates to represent Tennessee Democrats at the national convention to be held in Charlotte, N.C. scheduled for Sept. 3, 2012.

All written public comments received between today and May 30 will be submitted to the Democratic National Committee Rules and Bylaws Committee, the body that must issue final approval to the plan.

The full text of the delegate selection plan is available at www.tndp.org or by calling the Nashville headquarters at 615-327-9779.

–30–

Media Contact: Brandon Puttbrese, 615-327-9779